The Voice Of My Nonverbal Child

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In the five years I’ve been Olivia’s mother, I have learned that my voice is an important tool in my daughter’s well-being. With it, I hope to help Olivia obtain opportunities that may never have been presented to her and to assist in the assurance of equality.

As parents we strive to do what’s best for our children. Ideally we make sure they receive the proper balanced nutrition in their meals, practice good hygiene, be mindful of their manners, finish their homework, be respectful of others and be kind, loving people. We hope through this guidance that they one day will grow to be confident, good natured members of society. As a parent I value all of these ideals, but one ideal I didn’t list; which not many parents think about, is equality for their child. Parents to children with special needs have this on their minds everyday.

This day in age, equality should be a given, not a goal we wish to achieve. It shouldn’t have to be a topic of debate, but we see it everyday on the front pages of our newspapers, headlining stories on the news and trending on social media, instances in which individuals’ right to equal education, equal opportunity, equal employment, etc, etc, has been threatened.

I want a world for my children that offers opportunity for each of them. Neither of them should be scrutinized due to gender, disability or how they live their lives.

Olivia is only five, but in her five short years, myself and husband have had to be her advocate; her voice. Why? Because our daughter is disabled. I cant tell you how much I hate that word. The prefix “dis” promotes negative and an unwillingness; as if being different were something that were ugly or of burden; but it’s the definition society assigns to those who have limited abilities or differences in their physical appearances than that of our own. I recently heard the term difference of ability and thought how it promoted a more inclusive feeling. How the implementation of this term could potentially have a positive impact on how individuals with different needs are viewed. We all have different abilities, this is no different from an individual who relies on a wheelchair to move around or uses communicative technology to speak. Using these tools is just that; they are tools to assist that person in life. Would you ridicule someone for wearing glasses and limit their right to equality because of this? Of course not. Then why do we do so for those who also rely on assisted devices? I bet you never considered eye glasses to be an assisted device.

We have had to strive for funding for programs, equipment, educational opportunities, and developmental support. Everyday I wake up wondering what challenges, road blocks, or walls I will face and how will these challenges prevent Olivia from reaching her full potential or achieving the goals she sets for herself. Will she grow up in a world where she is viewed equal to her peers? One day I hope this to be true. For now I will continue to be her advocate, her voice and her biggest fan because I believe this world can be better for our children.

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