There Are Better Words To Use: End The R-Word

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Folks, why oh why is the r-word still spoken in cavalier conversation? I honestly hear it every single day, used to describe behavior, people, and situations. This word is offensive, ugly and carries a great deal of ignorance and insensitivity to the special needs community.

It’s easy to put this word to rest. Simply think before you speak.

I don’t believe you are a person, who would openly insult, offend or hurt people like my daughter; so I have to believe you just need to be enlightened. Each time you use the r-word, you are condoning the use of a word that defines people like my daughter as being less, broken, damaged, and stupid. I am informing you today. PLEASE hear me; STOP using the r-word!

There are an abundance of adjectives in the English language, there is no need to keep using the r-word as one. Today, make the effort, think before you speak and finally put an end to this word in our vocabulary. If not for me, please do it for her.

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Together We Can Bring Change

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When you are a family to a child with special needs, navigating through the various branches of health and rehabilitation services, sorting through funding grants offered by your province, special education programs offered in schools in your neighborhood, and many other resources that are available in your community; is an extensive learning curve. But what if you were required to do this every two, four or five years? Military families deal with many complex situations that are often challenging, but add the dynamic needs of a special needs child and you have a very unique situation. Often times, families feel very much alone, isolated.

We are a military family who also happen to be a family to a child with special needs. Each year, around this time, many military families are receiving news of postings to different cities or provinces. There are resources put in place to make the move as smooth as possible, but for military families like ours, we move to these regions with a huge unknown; what resources and services are available to our child? What support will our family receive? Families with special needs children require a contact at their new base, a liason; who is knowledgeable about services and can provide information that can guide the family through their new transition.

Recently our base has made this resource available. A special needs liason who can provide information about services and programs available in our area, who actively connects with community partners, organizes a special needs parents support group for military families, assists in the development of recreational programs and is knowledgeable about special education programs offered in the area. I am so overjoyed with the development of this position because so many military families will breathe a little easier. If you are a military family with a special needs child, contact your local military family resource center for information on who your liason might be. If there is not a specified liason for your base, try contacting the social worker connected to your center. They may be able to assist in the same degree, as a liason.

I also had the opportunity recently, to participate in a study that focused on information about services provided to military families upon relocation. It was an independent research study conducted by a university student, studying how to improve the quality of services and information provided to military families of children with special needs. The goal is to develop a type of information booklet, compiled with each province’s list of rehabilitation services, special education programs, community partners, special needs liason (if available), and other helpful resources including the contact information for each individual and to have this booklet available through local hospitals, military family resource centres, community partners and possibly schools. What a great resource this will be!

It is wonderful to see these issues recognized and new programs and resources developing because of it. They never would have happened without the participation of military families who were willing to share their concerns. Thank you to those whose voices helped to implement change and provoke thought into an area that went unrecognized for far too long.

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