Epilepsy Wasn’t A Term In Our Vocabulary

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Six months ago, epilepsy wasn’t a term we used in our vocabulary. Olivia had had one serious seizure two years ago, but nothing since then….or so we thought.

When you have a child with a complex medical condition, sometimes symptoms get overlooked because you think you are witnessing a symptom already associated with a diagnosed condition. Very disheartening as a parent to realize this wasn’t the case.

Olivia’s seizures went undiagnosed for about a year. We began to notice a pattern in her sleeping behaviour; she would awake the same time every night with episodes of vomiting. We originally took this for reflux. Then we began seeing behaviours when Olivia would drift off to sleep. These behaviours often appeared as twitching, arching, repetitive sounds, periods of semi-consciousness, and crying.

After several EEGs, one sleep deprivation and a video EEG, Olivia was officially diagnosed as having Epilepsy; a chronic seizure disorder usually associated with a neurological condition. Olivia already having Cerebral Palsy put her at a higher risk of developing Epilepsy.

So…the last six months have been a bit of a blur to say the least. I’ve joined several Epilepsy forums, trying my best to understand what my daughter is feeling prior, during and after the seizure has passed. Olivia is nonverbal so it is impossible for her to communicate what her body is experiencing, so finding the right medication to control her seizures was essential. I am happy to say we have!

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Throughout these past few months, I have learned so much; like for instance, seizures suck…BIG TIME! It never gets easier seeing your child’s body twitch, stiffen or move uncontrollably. I honestly hold my breath every time Olivia has a seizure. The dangers they present are a terrifying reality and an important reason as to why awareness and research are so important in the field of Epilepsy.

Epilepsy is now part of our life. Olivia’s seizures are now controlled, but we understand eventhough controlled, she can still have the occasional incident especially when she’s sick. So today, if you see someone wearing a purple ribbon, know it’s in support of Epilepsy Awareness.

Wonderful Wednesday

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We’ve been weathering through a few storms these last few weeks. Discovering that Olivia has epilepsy, our basement flooding, a serious lack of sleep, disputing a suspension from school notice issued through our public health office stating Olivia is behind on a particular vaccine (which she isn’t), and hitting a few bumps in the road with Olivia’s rehabilitation team; had me rock bottom, flat on my back, burnt out.

The first Wednesday of every month is a glorious day! This is when our special needs parents support group meets. I couldn’t have been more thankful for the arrival of this Wednesday. Being surrounded by others who get what you’re going through evokes a feeling of calm, peace and understanding. Sure not all of us share the exact same experiences, but to an extent we’ve each walked in the footsteps of the same path. It’s this, in its entirety, that makes support group so great.

The problems I had going into the group were not miraculously solved. That’s not what the group is for. What I get from going to our group, is a sense of peace. Talking, connecting and listening to other special needs parents share their experiences, helps me to remember that although this journey can be extremely difficult and challenging, I am not alone. Just the fact that they get it, calms my mind and I can readjust my focus. I feel a rejuvenation and walk away empowered, ready to face the hurdles that lie ahead.

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